×
×
×
×
×
×
×
×
×
×
×
×
×
×
×
×
×

How it Works 

The ProSeries1 uses high-quality, custom-sized capacitors to store and deliver Reactive* energy directly onsite. This energy is applied only when inductive loads like motors, transformers, chargers and fluorescent lights actually need it (video below).

This relieves your utility of the need to continually transmit Reactive energy, thereby reducing both the overall energy you draw from the grid as well as any related transmission fees, penalties or surcharges.

It also helps reduce your peak demand, the upper consumption limit often used to calculate individual utility rates.

Without this kind of conditioning, you will always “consume” and pay for more energy than you actually use.

The ProSeries1 generates real savings:

  • Reduces KWHs consumed
  • Reduces peak loads and related costs
  • Reduces equipment maintenance related expenses and down-time
  • Safeguards equipment and sensitive electronics against power surges up to 50,000 volts.

* Reactive energy is one of two types of electrical energy bundled by your utility company (the other is Active energy). Reactive energy is used solely to maintain a magnetic field inside equipment that contains an electromagnet — even when that equipment isn’t working.

The Power Factor 

Courtesy ElectroMechanica

Every electrical system performs at some degree of efficiency. The measure of that efficiency is called the Power Factor. High Power Factors mean less wasted energy and greater efficiency.

Power Factor is a ratio of Active Power (power output) to Apparent Power (power supplied) and is generally expressed as a decimal or percentage. Depending on the application, low Power Factors may hover around 60 or 70 percent, while Power Factors produced by the ProSeries1 climb closer to 95 percent or better.

That’s what happens when high quality capacitors are introduced to your system. By effectively managing Active and Reactive energies you also add system capacity, improve voltage levels and reduce power losses.

Benefits of Power Factor Correction

In areas where a peak demand clause or some form of low power factor penalty is assessed by your utility the ProSeries1 lowers your power bill by reducing kVA or kVAR demand.

If a system has an existing overload, our capacitors may eliminate it. If the system is not overloaded, the ProSeries1 releases additional capacity, thereby helping you avoid new investments in more expensive transformers, switchgear and cabling.

Excessive voltage drops can make your motors sluggish and cause them to overheat. Low voltage also interferes with your lights, motor controls and electronics. The ProSeries1 maintains more consistent voltage levels throughout your system, including feeder lines right out to the last motor. Overall performance improves — and so does production.

While doing all this, the ProSeries1 protects your entire system against power surges up to 50,000 volts. It’s also easy to install and requires no special cooling or maintenance.

Learn more: General Electric | Power Factor

Less Maintenance, Lower Overhead

The ProSeries1 reduces overall energy consumption while allowing your equipment to operate at peak efficiencies. You experience fewer mechanical problems, less maintenance, increased equipment life, and lower overhead costs:

  • Potential energy savings of 8-10% or better
  • Surcharge costs reduced or eliminated
  • Fewer voltage drops and low voltage issues
  • Extended equipment life-cycles

Ideal for both sensitive circuitry and heavier applications:

  • Lighting Systems
  • HVAC Systems
  • Refrigeration
  • Pumps and Motors
  • UPS Rooms
  • Master Control Units
  • Data Management Centers
  • And much more ....

Benefits Summary

  • Reduced energy consumption and peaks
  • Longer lasting, more efficient equipment
  • Power surge protection up to 50,000 volts
  • Easy install, no maintenance required

Technology News rss icon

Feb 24, 2020

'Mad' Mike Hughes dies after crash-landing homemade rocket

"Mad" Mike Hughes, 64, wanted to launch himself into space to prove that the Earth was flat.

How lake gases are powering homes in Rwanda

Methane is being extracted from Lake Kivu in Rwanda to generate electricity.

Study finds quarter of climate change tweets from bots

Researchers at Brown University found bots were far more likely to post tweets denying climate change.

Email address charges branded 'daylight robbery'

Ofcom is asking why broadband firms charge people to keep old email addresses after switching providers.

Nintendo: Animal Crossing fans upset by cloud restrictions

Nintendo confirms its new Animal Crossing game will not let players save progress to the cloud.

Scientists discover powerful antibiotic using AI

Researchers claim it could be used to kill some of the world's deadliest bacteria.

Data breach hits agency overseeing White House communications

The personal data of about 200,000 people is exposed in a cyber-attack.

Google sued by New Mexico over claims it spies on US students

Pupils in New Mexico allegedly have had their online data tracked, says the state's attorney general.

Samsung explains mystery alert sent overnight

The company says it sent the strange "1" alert to Samsung devices by mistake.

Thousands of mobiles and laptops lost by UK government in a year

At least 2,004 government mobiles were lost or stolen in a year, more than a third from the MoD.

ISS World hack leaves thousands of employees offline

ISS World, a major facilities provider, has been hit by an apparent ransomware attack.

Robots gain lessons in hot dogs and other tech news

BBC Click’s Paul Carter looks at some of the best technology news stories of the week.

The man who can make music with his mind

Academic and electronic musician Bertolt Meyer has hacked into his prosthetic arm and connected it to his synth.

Skin-detection software could improve smartphone security

TrinamiX has developed a facial recognition software that they say could provide better security.

The doctors and lawyers giving advice on TikTok

The BBC meets the medics and lawyers across America who are using the app to help educate the public.

The fake 'kitchen hacks' with billions of views

Kitchen hacks and baking videos are hugely popular on YouTube - but do all the tips actually work?

Can computer translators ever beat speaking a foreign tongue?

Developers say you can now converse effortlessly using translation tech, but others are not so sure.

Instagram influencers pranking the internet:

An Instagram influencer has faked a holiday to Bali to show followers not to believe everything they see on social media. But how does it compare to these other epic social media pranks?